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Visit TheApple.com to enter to win my book, Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job.  It’s really simple.  Good luck!

This a great book for aspiring teachers, student teachers, and job seekers.

Book Description

Maximize your teacher training, excel at student teaching, and find your ideal teaching job. This book addresses these unique stages of becoming an educator by providing 50 valuable strategies and insightful advice, allowing for a smooth transition from student teacher to exemplary teacher. Learn how to differentiate yourself through your coursework, create a positive relationship with your cooperating (master) teacher, establish effective classroom management, perform well in your interview, and much more.

Book link: Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job

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I have good news!  My book, Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job climbed to the number 1 spot under the category of student teaching.  When it was first published in 2008 it was positioned on page 88 of Amazon.com’s search results.   Yikes.   However, word has been spreading.  Thanks to everyone that has purchased a copy of my book and have recommended it to aspiring and beginning teachers. 

Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job

Hundreds of preservice, beginning, and RIF’d teachers attended a local teacher job fair.  There was a line of teachers that streched around the block to enter this job fair.  It was record attendance!  “Hiring” principals were ready to greet each perspective candidate and then rank them on a predetermined scale.  The scale is different for each principal, but its basically from the low end of do not to call back this candidate to, as one principal said, candidate “walks on water” and must be called to interview

I listened to several principals talk about their experiences at this job fair.  Some were funny and some were scary.  Each principal had their own approach when interacting with each prospective candidate.  One principals said he listens to candidates, only asking a few questions here and there.  Another principal said she asks the prospective candidates interview questions.  Her favorite questions was, “What is your ideal classroom?”  She said that many of the candidates would be stumped and just say “ummmmm.” 

How do you think these candidates were ranked?

I solicited advice from the principals on what candidates should do to help improve their chances of being called back on an interview.  Here are some nuggest of their advice:

Social Graces

Remember your manners and how to properly greet someone.  When you (the teacher candidate) approach a hiring principal at a job fair be sure to shake their hand, introduce yourself, and make eye contact.  From the start you need to establish a personal connection with the principal.  Next, ask the principal if they would like a copy of your resume.  A principal told me that too many candidates would come up, not introduce themselves, and hand them their resume without asking.  This is a no-no.  Start off your interaction on the right foot.

Do Your Homework

When you get notice of an upcoming teacher job fair do some basic homework.  Make a list of school districts and schools that interest you.  Then, do research on the schools (see my book for research strategies/tips).  Copy down your notes and review them right before you speak with the principal from that respective school.  This demonstrates to the hiring principal at the job fair that you have a strong interest in their school and you are familiar with it.  This will set you apart from other candidates, improving your ranking.  Also, it will give you some conversation material when it’s your turn to talk. 

Come Prepared

Another tip the principals told me was that job candidates should come to the fair with their resumes and, if possible, a few letters of recommendation.  The letters of recommendation give the prinicpal greater insight into who you are.

Additional Resources to Get You Hired

Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job

Web’s Largest Collection of Teacher Interview Questions

Sometimes we need a little help when it comes to our resumes.  I came across this helpful blog post that outlines words you want to avoid on the resumeClick here for the link.  Also, check out my book for step-by-step advice on how to construct an effective teacher resume.

Eric

Thank you.

Since its’ launch last summer, Road to Teaching has grown considerably.  Over 11,000 aspiring, student, and beginning teachers visited this website, learning about teaching strategies and topics, discovering resources, and finding support.  

This growth couldn’t be possible without the voice of our contributors, teachers collaborating, and people around the world emailing in their insights, stories, and teacher interview questions.

We recently won “Best of the Web” by TeAchnology.  Also, we parterned with TheApple.com  to futher support student teachers.

What’s New

Road to Teaching continually focuses on three areas:  talking about student teacher topics, providing additional teacher interview questions and answers, and expanding our list of effective vocabulary strategies.

Student Teacher Topics

Our number of posts addressing student teacher topics continually expands.  To make it easier for our visitors, we have started to categorize the various topics: parent/family communication, stress management, and much more.

Teacher Interview Questions

Recently, we launched possible answers to teacher interview questions.  These are excerpts from the book Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job.

Effective Vocabulary Strategies

Check out our new page dedicated to gathering effective vocabulary strategies. Please send your strategies to eric@road2teaching.com