You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Finding a Job’ tag.

Google Alerts can be a useful tool for current teachers and job seekers.  Google Alerts are email updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, etc.) based on your choice of query or topic.

Some handy uses of Google Alerts includes:

  • monitoring current on education initiatives, trends, and reform, and
  • keeping tabs on your school or schools (districts) that you would like to work in.  Knowing this information may give you an advantage over another job applicant.

Go to http://www.google.com/alerts to sign-up.

5.0 out of 5 stars So Simple Sooo Helpful WOW, September 29, 2008

By Eileen (Albuquerque)

This book is a must have!! I always read reviews and consider what the reader says, well please believe me, When I say get the book. It is so simple to ready I couldn’t believe the insight it gives and tips for Students, Pre-service teachers and Student teaching. I highlighted and tagged pages. I am very pleased!! Eric did an awesome job on creating a book for the “unknowns” A lot of websites and examples, book references. Again a very great book for Teachers to be, get it early.

4.0 out of 5 stars Good book to get you started, July 10, 2009

By Laura (Tacoma, WA)
(REAL NAME)

I bought this book right before my student teaching, and while I didn’t use it so much before my student teaching (despite there being a whole section dedicated to the pre-service teacher), it came in handy for what to expect during student teaching and what to do after. There is a website for the book that gives you extremely helpful information, such as the most asked interview questions, to help you prepare and land a job.

If you need some help with the unspoken “rules” of student teaching, or some tips to get a job, this book will help you. Establishing networks in bigger districts is a little harder to do, but those sections may work for smaller districts where there is only one high school, etc.

5.0 out of 5 stars Great resource, July 5, 2008

By Rob (Seattle, WA USA)
(REAL NAME)

This book came in handy as a student teacher and when applying for teaching jobs. I appreciated the strategies on how to jump-start my student teaching on a positive note by creating relationships with my students and CT. Even though I have now completed my student teaching, I will continue to use many of the book’s classroom management and discipline tips in my own classroom, such as the question & answer box and bellnote activity. I recommend this to any student teacher.”

Pick up your copy today!

Amazon.com

lulu-logo

logo_contrast

The education job market is in the midst of a major downturn.  It’s hard on anyone looking a teaching job.  Consider broadening your job search to on-line job market places.  Road to Teaching recommends K-12 Jobs.com.

Don’t lose hope.

-Eric

P.S. Check out Road to Teaching’s Teacher Interview page – the web’s largest collection of teacher interview questions.

The Department of Education released a nationwide listing of all the teacher shortage areas through March 2009 (see below).  In my book I mention the benefits of seeking additional endorsements/certifications, specifically in high need areas.  Check out your state’s shortage areas, and consider whether you have positioned yourself to take advantage of this.

RESOURCES

Road to Teaching: A Guide to Teacher Training, Student Teaching, and Finding a Job

DOE’s Statewide Listing of Teacher Shortages

Stop and think before you answer this question.  The interviewers really don’t want to hear your life story or the names of all your 20 cats.  Rather what they are listening for is how well you will fit into the school, work with your colleagues, and relate to your students.

Talk about yourself and 1-2 life experience, but ALWAYS tie it back to how it will help you in teaching. 

For example:

“I would describe myself as adventurous and outgoing.  Last year I traveled throughout Southeast Asia, traveling to four countries.  I love learning about new cultures and meeting new people.  This is one of the reasons I want to teach at {insert school name}.  It has amazing diversity.  I would take this same enthusiam and apply it to learning more about my students and their backgrounds.”

We can’t get through the day with0ut hearing about the economy.  Well, the bad economy has impacted education, specifically teacher hiring.  In some districts, hiring has been frozen.  Why?  Districts have no money for new hires or they are waiting to see how the stimulus money will trickle down from the the federal level to the state level to eventually the district level.  This weekend I spoke with a principal who said his hands are tied.  He can’t move on any hiring until this summer (when the District will release their budget).  This is extremely frustrating to principals who tend to want to wrap up their teacher hirings in April and May.  Its even more frustrating to aspiring teachers (job applicants) who are wondering when they will get an interview.

I asked the principal what his advice is to those teacher job applicants.  His advice was to ” keep being persistant.”  Here are some other ideas:

SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL

 

Now, aspiring and student teachers can order Road to Teaching as an e-book, SAVING close to 40%!

Preview my book at Lulu.com for free.  Learn how to differentiate yourself in your teacher preparation classes, create a positive relationship with your cooperating (master) teacher, establish effective classroom management, perform well in your interview, and much more.

Purchase your copy as an e-book version (Lulu.com $8.99) or as a print version (Amazon.com $13.99).

I recently posted Is There a Teacher Shortage?.  I read an article today that argues that the perceived teacher shortage is mainly due to teacher retention – a unique twist to this topic.  The article stated, “Our inability to support high-quality teaching in many of our schools is driven not by too few teachers coming in, but by too many going out, that is, by a staggering teacher turnover and attrition rate.”

I strongly agree with the recommendations stated in the article.  Of course, higher salaries are a given – who wouldn’t support that?  Just as important to me are the other recommendations: improving teacher preparation and supporting student and beginning teachers through an intensive mentoring program.  It is ridiculous to simply train teachers in a university classroom setting, require they complete a short stint student teaching, and then expect the majority of these beginning teachers will be highly effective in their own classrooms.  We all need constant feedback and support to grow professionally, thus greatly reducing teacher attrition and improving student achievement.  

The article was written in a few years ago, but the point is still relevant.  Click this link to read the article: Teacher Retention / Teacher Shortage.

 

“Both my husband and I are getting certified now (in the same subject) and will both be looking for jobs during the Summer 2009 hiring season.  Are there any articles or advice for those that will be looking for two jobs, not just one? In some countries its normal for employers to ask about your spouse’s situation when you interview for a job, but in America that’s against the law of course.  We think our situation would be an asset to most schools, but how does a couple “sell themselves” on this without seeming pushing or make their interviewer nervous? For example, should we go to job fair booths together, or make our rounds separately? Other teaching couples I know weren’t looking for jobs in the same hiring season, were certified in different subjects, or simply didn’t get married until they were both out of school.”

– Student Teacher

Click on comments for responses

Please email your student teacher questions to eric@road2teaching.com.